Endnotes

on .

[1] Orthodox and Conservative Jews celebrate this festival during the first two days of Tishri. Reform Jews keep the holiday one day. Some years, as in 1997, the festival is as late as October.

[2] Hayyim Schauss, The Jewish Festivals: History & Observance, (New York, Schocken Books, 1974), 113.

[3]All Jewish Scripture references from The Holy Scriptures: According to the Masoretic Text, (Philadelphia, The Jewish Publication Society, 1955).

[4] Michael Strassfeld, The Jewish Holidays: Guide and Commentary, (New York, Harper & Row, 1985), 96.

[5] Schauss, 113.

[6] Adin Steinsaltz, The Essential Talmud, (Northvale, NJ, Jason Aronson, 1992), 180.

[7] Schauss, 113, and also see 298 cf. 130.

[8] Ibid., 113.

[9] E.P. Sanders, The Historical Figure of Jesus, (London, Penguin Books, 1993), 11. This text has a fine explanation about source of current calendar.

[10] Schauss, 114 and cf. #120.

[11] Strassfeld, 96.

[12] Philip Birnbaum, A Book of Jewish Concepts, (New York, Hebrew Publishing, 1964), 560.

[13] Arthur Hertzberg, Judaism, The Key to Spiritual Writings of the Jewish Tradition, (New York, A Touchstone Book, 1991), 295.

[14] This text is from the Haftorah read on Yom Kippur, morning: Isa. 57:14-58:14 (Masoretic text, p. 610).

[15] Steinsaltz, 182.

[16] Ibid., 183.

[17] Sanders, 27.

[18] Steinsaltz, 124.

[19] Sanders, 23.

[20] Shaye J.D. Cohen, From the Maccabees to the Mishnah, (Philadelphia, Westminster Press, 1989), 17.

[21] Sanders, 26-27.

[22] Strassfeld, 120-121.

[23]Achtemier, Paul J., Harper’s Bible Dictionary, (San Francisco: Harper and Row, Publishers, Inc.) 1985.

[24] Rutherford H. Platt, Jr., Ed., The Forgotten Books of Eden, (New York, Meridian, 1974), viii.

[25] Ibid., 185.

[26] Cohen, 181.

[27] Ibid., 19.

[28] Schauss, 60-61.

[29] Meyer Levin, An Israel Haggadah for Passover, (New York, Harry Abrams, Inc. Publishers), 18.

[30] Ibid.

[31] Schauss, 61.

[32] Ibid., 60-61.

[33] This is likely due to the fact that Scripture rarely discusses the Ark after Solomon’s reign. For a more thorough discussion of the theory that the Ark of the Covenant was secretly taker to Ethiopia, consider Graham Hancock’s book The Sign and the Seal, (New York, A Touchstone Book, 1993),

[34] J.M. Flad, Falashas of Abyssinia, London, 1869, p. 3, quoted in Graham Hancock, The Sign and the Seal, (New York, A Touchstone Book, 1993), 134.

[35] Wolf Leslau, Falasha Anthology: The Black Jews of Ethiopia, (NY, Schocken, 1969), Xxvi.-xxvii.

[36] Schauss, 149-150.

[37] Ibid., 122.

[38] Steinsaltz, 125.

[39] Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz, The Talmud, The Steinsaltz Edition: A Reference Guide, (New York, Random House, 1989), 199-200.

[40] Steinsaltz, The Essential Talmud, 125.

[41] Strassfeld, 112.

[42] Ibid., 117.

[43] Encyclopedia Judaica, 1978 ed., S.v. “Kol Nidrei.”

[44] Achtemier, Paul J., Harper’s Bible Dictionary,

[45] Strassfeld, 116.

[46] “New Status Urged for Reform Jews,” Dallas Morning News, 11 March 1996, 6A.